Semi-autobiographical  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

Semi-autobiographical has two meanings. First, an autobiographical work may have been embellished or differently altered or fictionalized.

Secondly, novels may be thinly veiled memoir, semi-autobiographica novel or work of autofiction which draw heavily on the experiences of the author's own life for its plot. Authors may opt to write a semi-autobiographical novel rather than a true autobiographical novel or memoir for a variety of reasons: to protect the privacy of their family, friends, and loved ones; to achieve emotional distance from the subject; or for artistic reasons, such as simplification of plot lines, themes, and other details.

Semi-fiction

Semi-fiction is fiction implementing a great deal of non-fiction, for example: a fictional depiction "based on a true story", or a fictionalized account, or a reconstructed biography.

Often, even when the author claims the story is true, there may be significant additions and subtractions from the true story to make it more suitable for storytelling.

See also




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Semi-autobiographical" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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