Saul Bellow  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

Saul Bellow, born Solomon Bellows (Lachine, Quebec, Canada, June 10, 1915April 5, 2005 in Brookline, Massachusetts), was a Canadian-born American writer.

Bellow is best known for writing novels that investigate isolation, spiritual dissociation, and the possibilities of human awakening. Bellow drew inspiration from Chicago, his hometown, and he set much of his fiction there. His works exhibit a mix of high and low culture, and his fictional characters are also a potent mix of intellectual dreamers and street-smart confidence men. While on a Guggenheim fellowship in Paris, he wrote his best-known novel, The Adventures of Augie March (1953).



Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Saul Bellow" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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