Sade and Goya  

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 This page Sade and Goya is part of the Marquis de Sade series  Illustration: Portrait fantaisiste du marquis de Sade (1866) by H. Biberstein
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This page Sade and Goya is part of the Marquis de Sade series
Illustration: Portrait fantaisiste du marquis de Sade (1866) by H. Biberstein

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

French writer Marquis de Sade (1740 – 1814) and Spanish painter Francisco Goya (1746 – 1828) were near-contemporaries.

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Georges Bataille

In The Tears of Eros Georges Bataille compares two near-contemporaries: French writer Marquis de Sade (1740 – 1814) and the Spanish painter Francisco Goya (1746 – 1828). Sade was locked up in prison for half of his adult life, Goya was locked inside his own body, locked in his deafness. Both applauded the advent of the French Revolution. Both abhorred state religion. Both were obsessed with pain, but unlike Sade, Goya "did not associate pain with sensuous pleasure" ("Goya n'associa pas, comme Sade, la douleur à la volupté") but his violence approximates eroticism.

Bataille linked Goya with the Marquis de Sade, suggesting that they share a response to horror that ‘takes the form of a sudden leap into humour, and means nothing but just this leap into humour.‘ It is this Goya: irrational, expendable and hilarious, with whom the Chapmans collaborate. [1]

See also

Michel Foucault

"For Sade as for Goya, unreason continues to watch by night; but in this vigil it joins with fresh powers. The non-being it once was now becomes the power to annihilate. Through Sade and Goya, the Western world received the possibility of transcending its reason in violence, and of recovering tragic experience beyond the promises of dialectic.
After Sade and Goya, and since them, unreason has belonged to whatever is decisive, for the modern world, in any work of art: that is, whatever any work of art contains that is both murderous and constraining."

--Michel Foucault's Madness and Civilization, tr. Richard Howard

See also




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