Royal Museums of Fine Arts of Belgium  

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The Death of Marat (1793) by Jacques-Louis David
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The Death of Marat (1793) by Jacques-Louis David

"The Brussels Museum has always had much greater value than renown. What injures it in the eyes of people whose minds instinctively take long flights, is its being but two steps from our own frontier, and consequently the first stage in a pilgrimage which conducts to sacred shrines. Van Eyck is at Ghent, Memling at Bruges, Rubens at Antwerp. Brussels possesses as its own none of these great men. She did not witness their birth ; she scarcely saw them paint; she has neither their ashes nor their masterpieces." --The Old Masters of Belgium and Holland (1876) by Eugène Fromentin

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The Royal Museums of Fine Arts of Belgium (Dutch: Koninklijke Musea voor Schone Kunsten van België; French: Les Musées royaux des Beaux-Arts de Belgique), is one of the most famous museums in Belgium. The Royal Museum contains over 20,000 drawings, sculptures, and paintings, which date from the early 15th century to the present. The museum has an extensive collection of Flemish painting, among them paintings by Breughel and Rogier van der Weyden, Robert Campin (the Master of Flémalle), Anthony van Dyck, and Jacob Jordaens. The museum is also proud of its "Rubens Room", which houses more than 20 paintings by the artist. The Museum also houses the famous painting 'The Death of Marat' by Jacques-Louis David.

There are constant changing exhibitions. For example, in February 2007, the museum displayed exhibitions on the Belgian artist Leon Spilliaert and one showcasing Christmas food in Flemish painting.

See also

see also KMSKA




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Royal Museums of Fine Arts of Belgium" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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