Roman law and the insanity defense  

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Kunstformen der Natur (1904) by Ernst Haeckel
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Kunstformen der Natur (1904) by Ernst Haeckel

Roman law has two short dicta regarding the insanity defense

The first is "satis furore ipso punitur" from De lege Pompeia de Parricidiis (part of the Corpus Iuris Civilis) and freely translates as "an insane offender is punished sufficiently by his madness".

A variant on this phrase is "furiosus satis ipso furore punitur" (Eng: the madman is sufficiently punished by his madness) is attributed to Marcus Aurelius.

The second is dictum is "fati infelicitas excusat," which translates as "the bad luck of his fate is his excuse." The full citation is "Infans vel furiosus si hominem occiderint, lege cornelia non tenentur, cum alterum innocentia consilii tuetur, alterum fati infelicitas excusat" and it stems from the Lex Cornelia de sicariis et veneficis.

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Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Roman law and the insanity defense" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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