Real estate  

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  1. Property that cannot easily be moved, usually buildings and the ground they are built on.

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

Etymology

real; from French royale, from Latin regalis, royal, regal, from combining form reg- (nominative rex), king, + adjective suffix -alis

estate; from Latin status, condition, state

In spite of the name, real estate has no connection with the concept of reality. It derives instead from the feudal principle that in a monarchy, all land was considered the property of the king. Thus originally the term real estate was equivalent to "royal estate", real originating from the French royale, as it was the French-speaking Normans who introduced feudalism to England in the 11th century and thus the English language; cognate to Spanish real.

See also




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Real estate" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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