Psychogenic disease  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

Psychogenic disease (or Psychogenic illness) is a name given to physical illnesses that are believed to arise from emotional or mental stressors, or from psychological or psychiatric disorders. It is most commonly applied to illnesses where a physical abnormality or other biomarker has not yet been identified. In the absence of such "biological" evidence of an underlying disease process, it is often assumed that the illness must have a psychological cause, even if the patient shows no indications of being under stress or of having a psychological or psychiatric disorder.

Examples of diseases that are believed by many to be psychogenic include Psychogenic seizures, Psychogenic tremor and Psychogenic pain.

There are problems with the assumption that all medically unexplained illness must have a psychological cause. It always remains possible that genetic, biochemical, electrophysiological or other abnormalities may be present which we do not have the technology or background to identify.

The term psychogenic disease is often used in a similar way to psychosomatic disease. However, the term "psychogenic" usually implies that psychological factors played a key causal role in the development of the illness. The term "psychosomatic" is often used in a broader way, for example, to describe illnesses with a known medical cause where psychological factors may nonetheless play a role (e.g., asthma can be exacerbated by anxiety).

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Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Psychogenic disease" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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