Printmaking  

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Adspectus Incauti Dispendium (1601), woodblock title page from the Veridicus Christianus.
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Adspectus Incauti Dispendium (1601), woodblock title page from the Veridicus Christianus.
Le Ministère de la Marine (1865-1866) is a print by French etcher Charles Méryon depicting the marine ministry "attacked" by a charging flock of fantastic creatures.
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Le Ministère de la Marine (1865-1866) is a print by French etcher Charles Méryon depicting the marine ministry "attacked" by a charging flock of fantastic creatures.

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
old master print, print culture

Printmaking is the process of making artworks by printing, normally on paper. The process is capable of producing multiple copies of the same piece, which is called a print. Each copy is known as an impression. Painting or drawing, on the other hand, create a unique original piece of artwork. Prints are created from a single original surface, known technically as a matrix.

Each print is considered an original work of art, not a copy. Works printed from a single plate create an edition, in modern times usually each signed and numbered to form a limited edition. Prints may also be published in book form, as artists' books. A single print could be the product of one or multiple techniques.

Role in the history of the visual culture: democratic means of distribution.

Noted printmakers

See also




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Printmaking" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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