William, Prince of Orange  

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In 1877, French artist Édouard Manet exhibited "Nana", a life-size portrayal of a courtesan in undergarments, standing before her fully clothed gentleman caller. The model for it was the popular courtesan Henriette Hauser.
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In 1877, French artist Édouard Manet exhibited "Nana", a life-size portrayal of a courtesan in undergarments, standing before her fully clothed gentleman caller. The model for it was the popular courtesan Henriette Hauser.

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Prince William of Orange, Prince of the Netherlands, Prince of Orange-Nassau ; The Hague, 4 September 1840Paris, 11 June 1879), was from 17 March 1849 until his death the heir apparent of his father King William III of the Netherlands.

Biography

After the failed plans for a marriage between Prince William and Princess Alice of the United Kingdom, the second daughter of Queen Victoria, the prince fell in love with the noblewoman named Mathilde van Limburg Stirum. The relationship between the prince and his parents became very problematic, as the parents refused to accept Mathilde as his bride. By the standards of the Dutch royal family, a marriage between a member of the royal family and a member of the nobility was unequal and not acceptable. Possibly it also had to do with King William III having had a relationship with Mathilde's mother. Thus he might have feared that Mathilde was Prince William's half-sister.

William then went into exile in Paris, where he threw himself into a life of sex, drink and gambling. Henriette Hauser, his Parisian mistress, gave the Prince of Orange the pet name Lemon, something that led to him being known in the Parisian boulevard papers as the Prince of Lemon when they reported about his debauched and scandalous lifestyle. Prince William died at age 38 in his apartment in the Rue Auber, near the Paris Opera from a combination of typhus, liver complaints and total exhaustion. One 26 June, 1879, his body was entombed in the royal crypt at the New Church of Delft. But he had not lost all his social position in Paris. On his coffin there was a wreath from French Empress Eugénie and one from the British Prince of Wales (later King Edward VII). After his death, his brother Prince Alexander became heir and Prince of Orange. However he also died before their father who was now without direct male heirs. Neither his uncle, Prince Henry nor his great-uncle, Prince Frederick, had any male issue as well. The States-General adopted agnatic-cognatic primogeniture making his half sister, Princess Wilhelmina, heiress presumptive. Up until 1884, the Dutch throne used Salic law. Princess Wilhelmina successed their mutual father in 1890.





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