Penitent Magdalene  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
Mary Magdalene as a penitent

The traditional Roman Catholic feast day dedicated to Mary Magdalene celebrated her position as a penitent. This was changed in 1969, with the revision of the Roman Missal and the Roman Calendar, and now there is no mention in either of Mary Magdalene the sinner.

The Magdalene became a symbol of repentance for the vanities of the world to various sects. Mary Magdalene's name was also used for the Magdalen Asylum, institutions for "fallen women." including the infamous "Magdalen Laundries" in Ireland.

In the Orthodox Church, Mary Magdalene is not celebrated as a penitent, but rather as a woman who lived a virtuous life.

In art

Magdalen has provided artists an excuse to portray swooning and docile women.

A number of art works on this theme, including:




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Penitent Magdalene" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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