Pataphysical calendar  

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Ubu Roi (King Ubu) is a play developed by Alfred Jarry premiered on December 10 1896, and is widely acknowledged as a theatrical precursor to the Absurdist, Dada and Surrealist art movements.
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Ubu Roi (King Ubu) is a play developed by Alfred Jarry premiered on December 10 1896, and is widely acknowledged as a theatrical precursor to the Absurdist, Dada and Surrealist art movements.

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
The calendar is allegedly controlled by the Pataphysical College, which issues occasional revisions (perhaps most recently in 1971), replacing some saints' days with commemorations of more recent contributors to the pataphysical cause. Thus Isaac Asimov is remembered on 12 Pédale (=6 March) as "Saint Hari Seldon, psychohistorien galactique".[1]

The Pataphysical Calendar begins as a French student joke first perpetuated by Alfred Jarry, creator of fictional characters Père Ubu and Docteur Faustroll. The calendar was formatted similar to the contemporary French Catholic Calendar.

The first calendar was published by Jarry in L'Almanach du Père Ubu, illustré (Fasquelle, 1899) and was titled « calendrier du Père Ubu », Jarry later produced a second version also titled L'Almanach illustré du Père Ubu (Fasquelle, 1901), but is not until after Jarry's death in 1907, that the calendar is instated (1948) under the auspices of the Collège de ’Pataphysique which, in its statutes presents it like this:

(…)L'ère ’Pataphysique commence le 8 septembre 1873, qui d'ores en avant prend la dénomination de 1Template:Er du mois Absolu An 1 E.P. (Ère ’Pataphysique), et à partir de quoi l'ordre des 13 mois (douze de 28 jours et un de 29) du Calendrier ’Pataphysique est fixé comme suit:

The calendar consists of 13 months, 12 months of 28 days and one month of 29 days. The names of the months are inspired by pittoresque terms or neologisms. The calendar also have saints (Jean-Pierre Brisset, for example, en is one).





Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Pataphysical calendar" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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