Partition (politics)  

From The Art and Popular Culture Encyclopedia

Jump to: navigation, search

Related e

Google
Wikipedia
Wiktionary
Wiki Commons
Wikiquote
Wikisource
YouTube
Shop


Featured:
Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
Enlarge
Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

In politics, a partition is a change of political borders cutting through at least one territory considered a homeland by some community.

Common arguments for partitions include:

  • historicist – that partition is inevitable, or already in progress
  • last resort – that partition should be pursued to avoid the worst outcomes (genocide or large-scale ethnic expulsion), if all other means fail
  • cost–benefit – that partition offers a better prospect of conflict reduction than the if existing borders are not changed
  • better tomorrow – that partition will reduce current violence and conflict, and that the new more homogenized states will be more stable
  • rigorous end – heterogeneity leads to problems, hence homogeneous states should be the goal of any policy

See also




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Partition (politics)" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

Personal tools