Parisian café  

From The Art and Popular Culture Encyclopedia

Jump to: navigation, search

Related e

Google
Wikipedia
Wiktionary
Wiki Commons
Wikiquote
Wikisource
YouTube
Shop


Featured:
Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
Enlarge
Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

Parisian cafés serve as a function of social and culinary life of the Paris. They have been around for centuries in one form or another, the oldest one still in operation is "Café Procope" on Rue Buci, since 1686.

Paris cafés are the meeting place, the neighborhood hub, the conversation matrix, the rendez-vous spot, the networking source, a place to relax or to refuel, the social and political pulse of the city.

The café business sometimes doubles as a “bureau de tabac”, a sidekick tobacco shop that can sell you everything from metro tickets to prepaid phone cards.

Typical Paris cafés are not “coffee shops”. They generally come with a complete kitchen offering a restaurant menu with meals for any time of the day, a full bar and even a wine selection.

Paris cafés crystallize the quintessential Parisian way of sitting undisturbed for a couple of hours, delightfully watching the world go by. Some of the most recognizable Paris cafés include Café de la Paix, Les Deux Magots, Café de Flore, Le Fouquet’s, Le Deauville, as well as a new wave represented by Café Beaubourg, Drugstore Publicis and many more.

See also

café



Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Parisian café" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

Personal tools