Pan's Labyrinth  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

Pan's Labyrinth (Spanish: El Laberinto del Fauno, literally The Labyrinth of the Faun) is a Spanish-language fantasy film written and directed by Mexican film-maker Guillermo del Toro. Though the original title referred only to the mythological faun, the English title refers to the faun-like Greek god Pan. Del Toro has stated, however, that the faun featured in the film is not actually Pan.

Pan's Labyrinth, set in post-Civil War Spain, tells the story of a girl named Ofelia who is given three tasks by a mysterious faun. Meanwhile, her stepfather, the fascist Captain Vidal, viciously hunts for rebels in the region, and her pregnant mother grows ill. Heavily influenced by fairy tales and considered a spiritual sequel to Devil's Backbone, the film employed make-up, puppetry, and CGI effects to create its fantasy creatures.

The film, which garnered several Golden Globes and three Academy Awards, had its première in the 2006 Cannes Film Festival, and was released in the United Kingdom on November 24 2006. In the United States and Canada, it was given a limited release on December 29, 2006, with a nationwide release on January 19, 2007. Pan's Labyrinth has also won numerous international awards.



Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Pan's Labyrinth" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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