One Nation Under a Groove (song)  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

"One Nation Under a Groove" is a 1978 song by Funkadelic, the title track from their album One Nation Under a Groove, written by George Clinton/Walter Morrison/Garry Shider. The lyrics refer to dancing as a way to freedom, though the "dancing" could be easily seen as a metaphor of breaking boundaries, keeping with the album's theme. Compared to Funkadelic's earlier output, that was characterized by sound typical for rock music, this song has sound more typical for dance music. The 12" single of the song is an extension of the album track.

"One Nation Under a Groove" was released as a single and reached thirty-one on the Billboard Club Play Singles chart. It has endured as a dance funk classic and is probably Funkadelic's most widely-known song. "One Nation Under a Groove" peaked at number twenty-eight on the Hot 100 and reached number one on the Billboard Soul chart for six weeks, the longest of any number one single released in 1978.

The song is included in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame's list of 500 Songs That Shaped Rock and Roll. It is also ranked #474 on the Rolling Stone magazine's list of "the 500 Greatest Songs of All Time".




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "One Nation Under a Groove (song)" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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