Of Grammatology  

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De la grammatologie is a book by French philosopher Jacques Derrida, first published in 1967 by Les Éditions de Minuit. Of Grammatology, the English translation by Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak, was first published in 1976 by Johns Hopkins University Press. A corrected edition of the translation was published in 1998.

Of Grammatology is probably Derrida's most important work, and served to introduce his thought to a wide audience. It includes extensive discussion of the writings of Claude Lévi-Strauss, Ferdinand de Saussure, and Jean-Jacques Rousseau. Derrida also discusses the work of Étienne Condillac, Louis Hjelmslev, Edmund Husserl, Roman Jakobson, Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz, André Leroi-Gourhan, and William Warburton. Of Grammatology introduced many of the concepts which Derrida would employ in later work, especially in relation to linguistics and writing.

Influence

Of Grammatology is one of three books which Derrida published in 1967, and which served to establish his reputation. The other two were La voix et le phénomène, translated as Speech and Phenomena, and L'écriture et la différence, translated as Writing and Difference. It has been called a foundational text for deconstructive criticism.

See also




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Of Grammatology" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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