Nymphomania  

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This page Nymphomania is part of the woman series  Illustration: The Birth of Venus (detail), a 1486 painting by Sandro Botticelli
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This page Nymphomania is part of the woman series
Illustration: The Birth of Venus (detail), a 1486 painting by Sandro Botticelli

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

Nymphomania is an archaic term denoting an excess of sexual behavior or sexual desire in women.

The term was first attested ("ideò nymphomania appellatur") in François Ranchin in his Opuscula medica (1627).

Nymphomania, or a Dissertation Concerning the Furor Uterinus, a treatise dedicated to nymphomania was published in 1771 by the French physician J.D.T. de Bienville. The work is seen as a pendant to L'Onanisme (1760), the famous treatise on onanism by Samuel-Auguste Tissot.

In medical phraseology, the term nymphomania is no longer in use, being covered by the gender neutral term hypersexuality. The male equvalent of the condition used to be called satyriasis.

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Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Nymphomania" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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