Nip/Tuck  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Nip/Tuck is an American drama series created by Ryan Murphy, which aired on FX in the United States. The series focuses on McNamara/Troy, a plastic surgery practice, and follows its founders, Sean McNamara and Christian Troy. Each episode typically involves the cosmetic procedures of one or more patients, and also features the personal and professional lives of its main cast.

The show began in 2003, and the sixth and final season started airing October 14, 2009, and concluded the series on March 3, 2010, with the 100th episode. While the show was initially set in Miami, at the end of the fourth season the practice was relocated to Los Angeles and many of the characters have followed. The show had 45 award nominations, winning a Golden Globe and an Emmy. Series creator Ryan Murphy has said that the medical cases on the show are "100 percent based on fact".

Overview

This drama is set in a plastic surgery center, McNamara/Troy, centering around the two doctors who own it. Sean McNamara (Dylan Walsh) is having problems at home, trying to keep his family together, trying to patch up the rocky road he and his family are living. On the other hand, sex-craving Christian Troy (Julian McMahon) uses his charm to bring in potential female candidates and conducts shady business deals, often for the love of money. While Sean takes his job seriously, he often has to fix Christian's mistakes.





Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Nip/Tuck" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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