Nine Worthies  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

The Nine Worthies (les neuf preux) are nine historical, scriptural, mythological or semi-legendary figures who, in the Middle Ages, were believed to personify the ideals of chivalry. They were first described in the early fourteenth century, by Jacques de Longuyon in his Voeux du Paon (1312). Neatly divided into triads, these men were considered to be paragons of chivalry within their particular tradition: be it either Pagan, Jewish, or Christian. De Longuyon's choices soon became a common theme in the literature and art of the Middle Ages and earned a permanent place in the popular consciousness. Female equivalents were sometimes added, though the women chosen varied.

The Nine

The Nine Worthies were:




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