Nicene Creed  

From The Art and Popular Culture Encyclopedia

Jump to: navigation, search

Related e

Wikipedia
Wiktionary
Shop


Featured:

Kunstformen der Natur (1904) by Ernst Haeckel
Enlarge
Kunstformen der Natur (1904) by Ernst Haeckel

The Nicene Creed (Latin: Template:Lang) is the creed or profession of faith (Greek: Template:Lang) that is most widely used in Christian liturgy. It is called Nicene (Template:PronEng) because, in its original form, it was adopted in the city of Nicaea by the first ecumenical council, which met there in 325.

It is given high importance in the Eastern Orthodox Church, Assyrian Church of the East, Oriental Orthodox churches, the Roman Catholic Church, including the Eastern Catholic Churches, the Old Catholic Church and its offshoots, the Lutheran Church, the Anglican Communion, and almost all branches of Protestantism, including the Reformed churches, the Presbyterian Church, and the Methodist Church.

For current English translations of the Nicene Creed, see English versions of the Nicene Creed in current use.




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Nicene Creed" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

Personal tools