New York Society for the Suppression of Vice  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

The New York Society for the Suppression of Vice (NYSSV or SSV) was founded in 1873 by Anthony Comstock and his supporters in the Young Men's Christian Association. Comstock was succeeded by John Sumner.

It was an institution dedicated to supervising the morality of the public.

In 1919 it failed in its effort to suppress the fantasy novel Jurgen, A Comedy of Justice by James Branch Cabell and ended up giving it considerable publicity and boosting its sales.

In 1920 after the magazine The Little Review serialized a passage of the book Ulysses dealing with the main character masturbating, the New York Society for the Suppression of Vice, who objected to the book's content, took action to attempt to keep the book out of the United States. At a trial in 1921 the magazine was declared obscene and as a result Ulysses was banned in the United States.

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Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "New York Society for the Suppression of Vice" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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