Neo-Dada  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

Neo-Dada is a label applied primarily to the visual arts describing artwork that has similarities in method or intent to earlier Dada artwork. Neo-Dada is exemplified by its use of modern materials, popular imagery, and absurdist contrast. It also patently denies traditional concepts of aesthetics. The term was popularized by Barbara Rose in the 1960s and refers primarily, although not exclusively, to a group of artwork created in that and the preceding decade. In recent times the term neo-Dadaists has been applied to an international group of artists known as the Kroesos foundation led by Mark Divo. In the winter of 2002 they took over the Cabaret Voltaire in Zurich until they were evicted on March 2, 2002.

Artists linked with the term include Jasper Johns, Yves Klein, Robert Rauschenberg, Claes Oldenburg, and Jim Dine. The movement also helped inspire Pop Art and the art group Fluxus.

List of neo-Dadaists

See also




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Neo-Dada" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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