National personification  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
national stereotype

A national personification is an anthropomorphization of a nation; it can appear in both editorial cartoons and propaganda.

Some early personifications in the Western world tended to be national manifestations of the majestic wisdom and war goddess Minerva/Athena, and often took the Latin name of the ancient Roman province. Examples of this type include Britannia, Germania, Hibernia, Helvetia and Polonia.

A national personification is not the same as a national animal, and many countries have both, quite distinct from each other. The division is not, however, always watertight - for example, in some cartoons it is the national animal rather than the human personification which is used to represent a country.

See also




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "National personification" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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