My thoughts have been replaced by moving images (detourned comic)  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

My thoughts have been replaced by moving images[1] is a detourned comic of uncertain origin by an anonymous artist. It can be found on a page of similar comics.[2].

The speech bubble text has an impressive pedigree. "I can no longer think what I want to think. My thoughts have been replaced by moving images" is a 1930 lament by French author Georges Duhamel, made famous by German philosopher Walter Benjamin in his essay The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction. The English translation of this phrase is first featured in Illuminations (1968), an anthology of Benjamin writings translated by Harry Zohn.

The comic is reminiscent of an earlier detourned comic, Roy Lichtenstein's Drowning Girl[3] (1963).

See also




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "My thoughts have been replaced by moving images (detourned comic)" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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