Mons pubis  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

In human anatomy or in mammals in general, the mons pubis (Latin, pubic mound), also known as the mons veneris (Latin, mound of Venus) or simply the mons, is the soft mound of flesh present in women just above the genitals, raised above the surrounding area due to a pad of fat lying just beneath it which protects the pubic bone. It is anterior to the symphysis pubis.

The size of the mons pubis varies with the general level of body fat. After puberty it is normally covered with pubic hair.

In humans, the mons pubis divides into the labia majora (literally "larger lips") on either side of the furrow, known as the cleft of venus, that surrounds the clitoris, vaginal opening, and other structures of the vulva. The fatty tissue of the mons veneris is sensitive to estrogen, causing a distinct mound to form with the onset of puberty. This pushes the forward portion of the labia majora out and away from the pubic bone, and parallel to the ground (when standing).

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Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Mons pubis" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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