Money-rich, time-poor  

From The Art and Popular Culture Encyclopedia

Jump to: navigation, search

Related e

Google
Wikipedia
Wiktionary
Wiki Commons
Wikiquote
Wikisource
YouTube
Shop


Featured:
Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
Enlarge
Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

Money-rich, time-poor is an expression which arose in Britain at the end of the 20th century to describe groups of people who, whilst having a high disposable income through well-paid employment, have relatively little leisure time as a result. Time poverty has also been coined as a noun for the phenomenon.

Many people accept time poverty as a necessary condition of employment; others have sought to solve the problem through downshifting or through adoption of flexible working arrangements. The problem affects both salaried workers who work long hours even though they might be well compensated as well as hourly low-wage workers who work long hours to earn more money.

The idea of "money-rich, time-poor" has been reflecting in the human right to rest and leisure, provided for in Article 24 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights

See also




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Money-rich, time-poor" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

Personal tools