Mona the Virgin Nymph  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

Mona the Virgin Nymph (or simply Mona) was the first pornographic film depicting explicit sex to receive wide theatrical release in the United States (1970) [1], following the previous decade's nudist-themed films (called "Beaver films"). The minimal plot involves the titular Mona (played by Fifi Watson), who has promised her mother that she would remain a virgin until her impending marriage.

Mona paved the way for future films featuring explicit hardcore sex to appear in theaters, and was the model on which those films were based; indeed, Deep Throat borrowed elements of its plot two years later.

It was produced by Bill Osco and directed by Michael Benveniste and Howard Ziehm [2], though the film was screened without credits due to legal concerns. The earnings from this film helped finance the directors' later film Flesh Gordon.

The team also produced another adult movie, Harlot (1971) and Bill Osco later produced the similarly explicit Alice in Wonderland (1976).

The film, produced by Bill Osco, was the first full-length pornographic heterosexual film to receive an X rating.

Plot

The film's title character, Mona is engaged to be wed. Although she intends to remain a virgin until her wedding night, fellatio has intrigued her since she was a child. Her fiancé arranges a party to allow her to further explore her interests.

Cast

Fifi Watson played the role of Mona, with Ric Lutz as Tim, Judy Angel as Mona's mother and Susan Stewart as a Hooker.

See also





Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Mona the Virgin Nymph" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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