Modernist film  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
The rise of cinema and "moving pictures" in the first decade of the 20th century gave Modernism an artform which was uniquely its own, but it was largely undervalued by the literary and art intelligentsia. --Sholem Stein on modernist film

Modernist cinema is the cinematic form of modernism. Since cinema is essentially modernist, this is somewhat of a tautology.

However, films such as The Silence (1963) by Ingmar Bergman, Alain Resnais's Last Year at Marienbad (1961), Michelangelo Antonioni's L'avventura (1960), and Luis Buñuel's Belle de Jour (1967) have been classified as a landmarks of modernist cinema.

See also




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Modernist film" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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