Modernism, Mass Culture, and the Aesthetics of Obscenity  

From The Art and Popular Culture Encyclopedia

Jump to: navigation, search

Pornography
 is
 a
 limited
 genre
 but
 it
 has
 much
 to
 tell
 us
 about
 the
 modern
 period,
 during
 which
 it
 has
 simultaneously
 been
 transformed
 from
 a
 tool
 of
 political
 propaganda
 in
 the
 seventeenth and 
eighteenth 
centuries
 to
 a 
private 
sexual 
practice 
in 
the
 nineteenth and twentieth,
and
 from
 a
limited
 circulation
 amongst
 elite
 circles
 to
 ever
more
widely
 distributed
 forms
 of
 magazines,
 photographs,
 and
 Internet
 web
 sites.
 What
 this
 book
 will
 make
 clear
 is
 that,
 whether 
or 
not 
an 
individual 
has 
ever 
looked 
at 
or 
read 
a 
pornographic 
text, 
he 
or 
she 
has felt
 its
 impact
 in
 untold
 ways” 
 (xv)


"Those 
whose 
primary 
interest 
is
 obscenity
 law
 would
 be
 better
 served 
by 
the 
bibliography, which
 includes 
works 
such 
as
 Edward 
De
 Grazia’s
 Girls
 Lean
 Back
 Everywhere:
 The
 Law
 of
 Obscenity
 and
 the
 Assault
 on
 Genius
 (1992)
 and
 Geoffrey
 Robertson’s
 Obscenity: 
An
 Account
 of
 Censorship
 Laws
 and
 their
 Enforcement
 in
 England
 and
 Wales
 (1979).
 
 Modernism, Mass Culture, and the Aesthetics of Obscenity serves
 as
 a
 crucial
 review
 for
 those
 less
 familiar
 with
 applications
 of
 Kantian
 aesthetic
 theory,
 as
 Pease
 ensures
 that
 it
 remains
 present
 throughout
 the
 text,
 even
 in
 its
 continuously
 varying
 interpretations
 by
 British
 artists
 and
 critics.
" --Jamie
 Kathryn
 Gandy

Related e

Google
Wikipedia
Wiktionary
Wiki Commons
Wikiquote
Wikisource
YouTube
Shop


Featured:
Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
Enlarge
Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

Modernism, Mass Culture, and the Aesthetics of Obscenity (2000) by Allison Pease.

From the publisher

How did explicit sexual representation become acceptable in the twentieth century as art rather than pornography? Allison Pease answers this question by tracing the relationship between aesthetics and obscenity from the 1700s onward, focusing especially on the way in which early twentieth-century writers incorporated a sexually explicit discourse into their work. The book considers the work of Swinburne, Joyce and Lawrence and artist Aubrey Beardsley within the framework of a wide-ranging account of aesthetic theory beginning with Kant and concluding with F. R. Leavis, I. A. Richards and T. S. Eliot.

See also




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Modernism, Mass Culture, and the Aesthetics of Obscenity" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

Personal tools