Mexican Revolution  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

The Mexican Revolution (Template:Lang-es) was a major armed struggle that started with an uprising led by Francisco I. Madero against longtime autocrat Porfirio Díaz. The first of the major revolutions of the 20th century, the Mexican Revolution was characterized by several socialist, liberal, anarchist, populist, and agrarianist movements.

It progressed into a protracted and multi-sided civil war. It produced the Mexican Constitution of 1917. The Revolution is generally considered to have lasted until 1920, although the country continued to have sporadic but comparatively minor outbreaks of rebellion in the 1920s, with the major exception of the Cristero War. The Revolution triggered the creation of the National Revolutionary Party in 1929 (renamed the Institutional Revolutionary Party or PRI in 1946). Putting forward a variety of leaders, the PRI held power and led the country until the general election of 2000.



Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Mexican Revolution" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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