Method (music)  

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In music, a method is a kind of textbook for a specified musical instrument or a selected problem of playing a certain instrument.

A method usually contains fingering charts or tablatures, etc., scales and numerous different exercises, sometimes also simple etudes, in different keys, in ascending order as to difficulty (= in methodical progression) or with a focus on isolated aspects like fluency, rhythm, dynamics, articulation and the like. Sometimes there are even recital pieces, also with accompaniment. Such methods differ from etude books in that they are meant as a linear course for a student to follow, with consistent guidance, whereas volumes of etudes are not as comprehensive.

As typical instrumental methods are meant to function as textbooks supporting an instrumental teacher (rather than to facilitate self-teaching), usually no basic or special playing techniques are covered in any depth. Detailed instructions in this respect are only found in special, autodidactical methods.

Some methods are specially tailored for students on certain skill levels or stages of psychosocial development. In contrast, a 'complete' method (sometimes in multiple volumes) is meant to accompany the student until he or she becomes an advanced player.

Methods of certain authors or editors have achieved the status of standard works (reflecting regional and cultural differences) and are published or reissued by different publishing companies and in divers (new) arrangements. The Suzuki Method is probably the most well known example of this.

The following is a list of various methods of historical interest.

Contents

Woodwinds

Flute

Oboe

Clarinet

Bassoon

Saxophone

Brass

Trumpet/Cornet

Horn

Trombone

Voice

Keyboards

Piano

Harpsichord/Clavichord

Organ

Strings

Guitar


Harp


Violin

Viola

Violoncello





Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Method (music)" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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