Metacinema  

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"A self-referential film is one which is about itself. Unlike the traditional narrative film, which seeks to maintain the illusion that what we are seeing is reality, the self-referential film wants to show that it itself is an illusion. Consequently, one often sees the camera, the mike, the movieola, the cutting board, even, occasionally, the audience—us. In showing that it is an illusion, however, the self-referential film also suggests another reality—that, for example, of the makers of the self-referential film we are seeing. This reality is presented as a more real reality than that which the ordinary illusion-film offers. All self-referential cinema becomes, then, a search for reality, or for truth." --Donald Richie, "Self-Referential Cinema" (1971)

 This page Metacinema is part of the meta series. Illustration: Reverse Side of a Painting (1670) by Cornelis Norbertus Gysbrechts, an example of metapainting.
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This page Metacinema is part of the meta series.
Illustration: Reverse Side of a Painting (1670) by Cornelis Norbertus Gysbrechts, an example of metapainting.

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

Similar to metafiction in technique, the style of the film-making shows that the film is a metaphor about the production of the film and that the audience is tied in with the drama unfolding on the screen. Similar to metafiction in technique, metafilm is a style of film-making which presents the film as a story about film production. Examples of this would be Federico Fellini's , François Truffaut's Day for Night, Jean-Luc Godard's Le Mepris, Spike Jonze's Adaptation., Tom DiCillo's Living in Oblivion, Alejandro Jodorowsky's The Holy Mountain, Wes Craven's New Nightmare, Michael Powell's Peeping Tom, David Lynch's Mulholland Drive, Charlie Kaufman's Synecdoche, New York.

An example of a comparable technique in theater would be Six Characters in Search of an Author by Luigi Pirandello and Living in Oblivion by Tom DiCillo.

Another example of metafilm is the use of film within a film, used as a plot device in such films as Circuito chiuso.

Examples of films

Metafiction#Film_and_television; Story_within_a_story#Film_within_a_film, List of films that break the fourth wall

See also




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Metacinema" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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