Martin Carlin  

From The Art and Popular Culture Encyclopedia

Jump to: navigation, search

Related e

Wikipedia
Wiktionary
Shop


Featured:

Kunstformen der Natur (1904) by Ernst Haeckel
Enlarge
Kunstformen der Natur (1904) by Ernst Haeckel

Martin Carlin (ca 1730 – 1785) was a Parisian ébéniste, born at Freiburg, who was received master at Paris in 1766.

Carlin worked at first in the shop of Jean-François Oeben, whose sister he married. He set up independently in the Faubourg Saint-Antoine, an unfashionable quarter of Paris, where few of his wealthy clientele would have penetrated. Carlin sold his works exclusively to marchands-merciers such as Simon-Philippe Poirier and his partner Dominique Daguerre, who acted as decorator-designers. It was only through these entrepreneurs that Carlin could acquire the Sèvres porcelain plaques that decorate many of his pieces. His earliest such pieces are datable by the marks on their porcelain to 1766; they followed designs supplied by the dealer Poirier. Although Martin Carlin made some larger pieces— secrétaires à abattant (drop-front secretary desks), tables, and commodes— he is best known for refined small furnishings in neoclassical taste, some of them veneered with cut up panels of Chinese lacquer, which he would also have received from the hands of the marchands-merciers.




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Martin Carlin" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

Personal tools