Marquis de Sade: His Life and Works  

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"Neue Forschungen über den Marquis de Sade und seine Zeit (1904), which is a substantially revised version of his earlier study on Sade, entitled Der Marquis de Sade und seine Zeit" (1900)" --Modernism and Perversion (2011) by Anna Katharina Schaffner

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

Marquis de Sade: His Life and Works (1931) is a work on Marquis de Sade first published by Brittany Press in 1931 and later republished by Castle Books, New York in 1948.

It is a translation of the work of Iwan Bloch by Solomon Malkin as James Bruce. There is an online version, probably based on Malkin's translation.

As of 2019, it was unclear to me whether the book was translated from Der Marquis de Sade und seine Zeit (1900), also partly from Neue Forschungen über den Marquis de Sade und seine Zeit (1904) or from both.

Excerpt:

"Next to the Marquis de Sade the most famous erotic writer of the Revolutionary period was the productive Restif (Rétif) de la Bretonne. We shall later evaluate Rétif de la Bretonne as one of the first critics of de Sade. We are at present interested in him only as a contemporary of de Sade and in his influence upon him. It was plainly Rétif, whom de Sade referred to unfavorably in his novels: "R… floods the public and needs a printing press next to his bed. By good fortune they groan alone under his frightful products; a dull decrepit style, nauseous adventures in the worst society; no other merit but a great verbosity for which only the store-keepers will be thankful." May not professional jealousy have played a part in his judgment? We will later see that Rétif did not think much better of de Sade. It may also be that the highborn Marquis thought himself far removed from the lowborn Rétif."

ToC

Contents The Age of Marquis de Sade

General Character of the Eighteenth Century in France French Philosophy French Royalty in the Eighteenth Century Nobility and Clergy Paris Police Reports on the Immorality of the Clergy The Jesuits The Black Mass Convents Woman The Erotic Literature Art Fashion Bordellos and Secret Pornologic Clubs The Prostitutes The Palais Royal and Other Public Places for Prostitution Onanism Tribadism Pederasty Flagellation and Phlebotomy Aphrodisiacs, Cosmetics, Abortions and Quackeries Gastronomy and Alcoholism Crime and Murder Poisoning Public Executions Ethnological and Historical Examples Conditions in Italy

The Life of Marquis de Sade

His Ancestors The Childhood of Marquis de Sade Youth His Prison Life Imprisonment in Vincennes and in the Bastille Participation in the Revolution and Literary Activity His Death

The Works of Marquis de Sade

Justine and Juliette The Preface Analysis of Justine Analysis of Juliette Philosophy in the Boudoir Other Works of Marquis de Sade Character of the Works of Marquis de Sade The Philosophy of Marquis de Sade

Theory and History of Sadism

Introduction Anthropophagy and Hypochorematophily Other Sexuo-Pathlogic Types of De Sade Arrangement of Erotic Individualities Lying and Sexual Perversions De Sade’s View of the Nature of Sexual Perversions Definition of Sadism Judgment of De Sade According to His Life and Works The Spread and Effect of Marquis de Sade’s Works Sadism in Literature Some Sadistic Moral Crimes

See also





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