Luc Sante  

From The Art and Popular Culture Encyclopedia

Jump to: navigation, search

Related e

Google
Wikipedia
Wiktionary
Wiki Commons
Wikiquote
Wikisource
YouTube
Shop


Featured:
Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
Enlarge
Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

Luc Sante (born 25 May 1954, Verviers, Belgium) is a writer and critic. Sante has written a number of books and is a frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books.

Contents

Biography

Born in Verviers, Belgium, Sante immigrated to the United States in the early 1960s. He attended school in New York City, first at Regis High School in Manhattan and later at Columbia University from 1972 to 1976; due to several incompletes and outstanding library fines, he did not take a degree. Since 1984 he has been a full-time writer. Sante is a frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books, where he worked first in the mailroom and then as assistant to editor Barbara Epstein. Sante has written on the subjects of film, art, photography, and miscellaneous cultural phenomena as well as book reviews.

His books include Low Life: Lures and Snares of Old New York (1991), Evidence (1992), the autobiographical The Factory of Facts (1998), Walker Evans (1999), Kill All Your Darlings: Pieces 1990-2005 (2007), Folk Photography (2009), and The Other Paris (2015). He co-edited, with the writer, his former wife, Melissa Holbrook Pierson, O. K. You Mugs: Writers on Movie Actors (1998), and translated and edited Félix Fénéon's Novels in Three Lines (2007) for the New York Review Books (NYRB) series.

In the early 1980s, he wrote lyrics for the New York City-based band The Del-Byzanteens. Sante wrote the text for Take Me To The Water: Immersion Baptism In Vintage Music And Photography, a collection of historical photos of American baptismal rites, published by Dust-to-Digital in 2009.

Having previously taught in the Columbia MFA writing program, Sante currently lives in Ulster County, New York and teaches writing and the history of photography at Bard College.

Works

Original text

Editor

Translator

Awards and honors

Pages linking in

William M. Tweed - H. P. Lovecraft - No wave - Timothy Leary - The Count of Monte Cristo - Not in Our Name - Scotty Moore - Stranger Than Paradise - Verviers - The Rules of the Game - Whiting Awards - Lower East Side - PS General Slocum - Grammy Award for Best Album Notes - Trilby (novel) - Jill Sobule - Anthology of American Folk Music - Park Slope - Parker (character) - Hannah Höch - Plug Uglies - International Center of Photography - Herbert Asbury - The Sons of Lee Marvin - Hudson Dusters - Albert Goldman - Aperture (magazine) - Regis High School (New York City) - Shakespeare and Company (bookstore) - Port of Shadows - Mystery Train (film) - Melissa Holbrook Pierson - Josh Hines - Sara Driver - Humpty Jackson - List of Columbia College people - The Threepenny Review - Christian Patterson - Suds Merrick - Edward MacDowell Medal - From Swastika to Jim Crow - Rob Walker (journalist) - Yeti (magazine) - Constance Rourke - Félix Fénéon - The Del-Byzanteens - Todd Hido - Peter Sawyer - Tanner Smith - Potashes (gang) - Rhodes Gang - Spanish Louie - Kit Burns - Boiled Oysters Malloy - Hole-in-the-Wall (saloon) - Frank Stephenson (saloon keeper) - The Dump (saloon) - Johnny Camphine - Red Light Lizzie - Post-punk - Fernanda Eberstadt - Cheryl Dunn - Low Life (book) - Larry Fink (photographer) - Annie Reilly - Jimmy Hope - Wreck Donovan - Jane Wilson - Remittance man - Atlantic Guards - Pedigree (Simenon novel) - List of Bard College people - David Levi Strauss - Fred Barney TaylorXaviera Simmons - Records and achievements of Madonna - The Point (magazine) - You Are Not I - Mürmur - The Bootleg Series Vol. 13: Trouble No More 1979–1981



Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Luc Sante" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

Personal tools