List of English chronicles  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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This is a list of the most important Chronicles relevant to the kingdom of England in the period from the Norman Conquest to the beginning of the Tudor dynasty (1066-1485). The chronicles are listed under the name by which they are commonly referred to. Some chronicles are known under the name of the chronicler to whom they are attributed, while some of these writers also have more than one work to their name. Though works may cover more than one reign, each chronicle is listed only once, with the dates covered. Only post-conquest dates have been included. Though many chronicles claim to describe history "from the earliest times" (from Brutus, from the creation, ab urbe condita), they are normally only useful as historical sources for their own times. Some of the later works, such as Polydore Vergil and Thomas More, are as close to history in the modern sense of the word, as to medieval chronicles.

Contents

William I (1066-1087), and William II (1087-1100)

Henry I (1100-1135)

Stephen (1135-1154)

Henry II (1154-1189)

Richard I, the Lionheart (1189-1199)

John of England 1199-1216)

Henry III (1216-1272)

Edward I (1272-1307)

Edward II (1307-1327)

Edward III (1327-1377)

Richard II (1377-1399) and Henry IV (1399-1413)

Henry V (1413-1422)

Henry VI (1422-1461 and 1470-1471)

Edward IV (1461-1470 and 1471-1483)

Richard III (1483-1485)

See also




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "List of English chronicles" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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