Lise Deharme  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

Lise Deharme (née Hirtz) (1898-1979), was a French writer associated with the Surrealist movement.

She was born in Paris in 1898, daughter of a famous doctor. She visited the Paris Bureau of Surrealist Research in 1925 and, as a result of an incident recorded in André Breton's Nadja, became known as "The Lady of the Glove".

She married Paul Deharme, the radio pioneer who worked with surrealist Robert Desnos, in 1927.

Her first publication was as Lisa Hirtz: Il était une petite pie [There was a little magpie] (with 8 pochoirs by Joan Miró) in 1928.

She was the editor of Le Phare de Neuilly, which frequently published articles relating to surrealism.

Bibliography

  • Il etait une Petite Pie - with illustrations by Joan Miró (1928)
  • Cahier de Curieuse Personne (1933)
  • Le Coeur de Pic - with photographs by Claude Cahun (1937) - republished by éditions MeMo (2004)
  • Cette Année-La - with preface by Paul Eluard (Gallimard, 1945)
  • Insolence (Fontaine, 1946)
  • Le Pot de Mousse (Fontaine, 1946)
  • Eve la Blonde (Gallimard NRF, 1952)
  • La porte d'à Côté (Gallimard NRF, 1949)
  • Le Poids d'un Oiseau - with illustrations by Léonor Fini (Terrain Vague, 1955)
  • Farouche à Quatre Feuilles - with André Breton, Julien Gracq and Jean Tardieu (Grasset, 1954)
  • Le Château de l'Horloge (Julliard, 1955)
  • Les quatre cents Coups du Diable (Deux-Rives, 1956)
  • Et la Bête (Grasset, 1957)
  • La Contesse Soir (1957)
  • Le Tablier Blanc - with engraving by Joan Miró (1958)
  • Laissez-moi Tranquille (Julliard, 1959)
  • Les Années Perdues, Journal, 1939-1949 (1961)
  • Carole ou ce qui plait aux Filles (Julliard, 1961)
  • Pierre de la Mermorte (Julliard, 1962)
  • L'Enchanteur (Grasset, 1964)
  • L'Amant Blessé (Grasset, 1966)
  • Oh! Violette ou la Politesse des Végétaux - with illustrations by Léonor Fini (Losfeld, 1969)
  • Valentina (1970)
  • Le Téléphone est Mort (Losfeld, 1973)
  • La Marquise d'Enfer (1977)
  • La Caverne (1984)

References




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Lise Deharme" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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