Le Charivari  

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The so-called "Typographic pear", a calligramme which was published on the cover of Le Charivari of February 27, 1834, subverting the magazine's obligation to publish the condemnation by presenting the text in the form of a pear.
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The so-called "Typographic pear", a calligramme which was published on the cover of Le Charivari of February 27, 1834, subverting the magazine's obligation to publish the condemnation by presenting the text in the form of a pear.
Les Poires, as sold separately to cover the expenses of a trial of Le Charivari
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Les Poires, as sold separately to cover the expenses of a trial of Le Charivari

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

Le Charivari was an illustrated newspaper published in Paris, France from 1832 to 1937.

Le Charivari published caricatures, political cartoons and reviews. In 1835 the government banned political caricature, thus Le Charivari began publishing satires of everyday life.

To reduce their financial risk of censorship fines with the satirical anti-monarchist illustrated newspaper La Caricature, which had more pages and printed on more expensive paper, caricaturist Charles Philipon and his brother-in-law Gabriel Aubert started Le Charivari which contained humorous, but not as political, content. Ownership of the paper changed often due to censorship, and related taxes and fines.

Le Charivari published daily from 1832 to 1936, and then weekly until 1937.

They also published fakes of the work of Rodolphe Töpffer in the late 1830s and early 1840s.

In 1841 English engraver, Ebenezer Landells, together with Henry Mayhew, used Le Charivari as the model for their Punch magazine subtitled The London Charivari.

Contributing artists

Contributing with lithographs, woodcuts, and (after 1870) with zincographies (gillotage) were:

Text came from, among others,

See also




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