Lady at her toilette  

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Woman at her Toilet (c. 1661-65) by Jan Steen. This detail shows the legs with sock marks.
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Woman at her Toilet (c. 1661-65) by Jan Steen. This detail shows the legs with sock marks.

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Lady at her toilette has been a popular theme in painting at least since the 17th century. The genre withered with the advent of modern art. Before the 20th century, toilet universally referred to personal grooming, bathing and washing, combing or arranging one's hair. It provided with a pretext to present a lady in a private setting in various stages of undress.

Jan Steen did at least two versions of the theme, Woman at her Toilet (Jan Steen, Rijkmuseum)[1] and [2].

Other versions include those of Antoine Watteau[3][4] and at least three by Francois Boucher ("La jupe relevée"[5], "La toilette intime"[6] and this untitled one [7], in the collection of Albert Langen, notes the book Erotic Art of the Masters the 18th, 19th, 20th Centuries Art & Artists).

Paintings titled "Toilette intime" usually include a bidet and make reference to the lady's intimate parts.

In the 20th century, there was La Toilette de Cathy[8], a painting by Balthus.

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Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Lady at her toilette" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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