Krieg dem Kriege  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

Krieg dem Kriege (1924, fully Krieg dem Kriege! Guerre à la Guerre! War against War! Oorlog aan den Oorlog!) is a work by Ernst Friedrich.

It is an anti-war photo-book depicting the horrors of war, known for its photos of war casualties.

It is also the provenance of the photo "The Image Of God With A Gas Mask"[1] ("Das Ebenbild Gottes mit Gasmaske"), a photo also attributed to Udo Bruhn.

The photos feature captions in Dutch, English, German and French.

From Publishers Weekly:

First published in Germany in 1924 as a protest against war, this collection of gruesome photographs and disgusted, sarcastic captions (in many cases, juxtaposing official slogans and rhetoric with brutal reality) will shock and dismay the reader. The images here include the dead on battlefields, destroyed buildings, starving civilians, army executions, cemeteries and, perhaps most disturbing, shots of soldiers disfigured in battle. Kellner, a University of Texas professor, provides a biographical sketch of Friedrich, who, as a socialist, refused to serve in World War I, was placed in a mental institution and eventually went to jail. After the war, he became an anarchist and pacifist and founded the Anti-War Museum in Berlin, which was shut down by the Nazis in 1933. Friedrich, who survived the Nazi era, died in 1967.

See also




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Krieg dem Kriege" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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