Jewish philosophy  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

Jewish philosophy refers to the conjunction between serious study of philosophy, Jewish scholasticism and Jewish theology. In one sense, it refers to all philosophical activity carried out by Jews or in relation to the religion of Judaism. In the very narrow sense, it is often used to refer to the views of Jewish scholastics, influenced by Plato, Aristotle, Mutazilites, Ismaili, Averroes, Kant and others. In a much broader sense, Jewish Philosophy attempts to reconcile coherent new ideas into many millenia of Torah and Talmudic study; thus organizing emergent ideas within a uniquely Jewish scholastic framework and world-view.

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Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Jewish philosophy" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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