Jean-Pierre Gorin  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

Jean-Pierre Gorin (born 1943, in Paris) is a French filmmaker and professor, best known for his work with Nouvelle Vague luminary Jean-Luc Godard during what is often referred to as Godard's "radical" period.

In 1968, Gorin and Godard founded the collective Dziga Vertov Group, and together produced a series of overtly political films including Vent d'est (1970), Tout va bien (1972), and Letter to Jane (1972). Gorin left France in the mid-1970s to accept a teaching position at the University of California, San Diego at the urging of the film-critic and painter Manny Farber. Gorin has remained on the faculty of Visual Arts at UCSD since 1975, where he teaches courses in film history and criticism to this day. He has also continued to make films - most notably a "Southern California trilogy" of essay films: Poto and Cabengo (1978), Routine Pleasures (1986), My Crasy Life (1991), and Letter to Peter (1992).



Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Jean-Pierre Gorin" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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