J. Bernlef  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

J. Bernlef (pseudonym for Hendrik Jan Marsman) (14 January 1937 - 29 October 2012) was a Dutch writer, lyricist, novelist and translator.

Marsman was born in Sint Pancras. He made his literary debut with Kokkels in 1960. He became known to a larger public with his novel Hersenschimmen from 1984, which treated the theme of dementia. The book was the basis for a 1987 film, and a theatre play of 2006. Bernlef received the P. C. Hooft Award for 1994.

Bernlef also wrote under the pseudonyms Ronnie Appelman, J. Grauw, Cas den Haan, S. den Haan, and Cas de Vries. He died, aged 75, in Amsterdam.

Awards

  • 1959: The Reina Prinsen Geerligsprijs for Kokkels.
  • 1962: The Poetry prize from the Government of Amsterdam for Morene.
  • 1964: The Lucy B. en C.W. van der Hoogtprijs for Dit verheugd verval.
  • 1964: The Poetry prize from the Government of Amsterdam for En dode hagedis.
  • 1977: The Vijverbergprijs for De man in het midden.
  • 1984: The Constantijn Huygens Prize.
  • 1987: The AKO Literatuurprijs for Publiek geheim.
  • 1989: The Diepzee-prijs for Hersenschimmen.
  • 1994: The P. C. Hooft Award, for complete works.

Translated books

  • Out of Mind (1984; 1988 English translation by Adrienne Dixon)
  • Public Secret (1987; 1992 English translation by Adrienne Dixon)
  • Eclipse (1993; 1996 English translation by Paul Vincent)

See also




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "J. Bernlef" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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