Independent Foreign Fiction Prize  

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The Independent Foreign Fiction Prize was inaugurated by British newspaper The Independent to honour contemporary fiction in translation in the United Kingdom. The award was first launched in 1990 and ran for five years before falling into abeyance. It was revived in 2001 with the financial support of Arts Council England. Beginning in 2011 the administration of the prize was taken over by Booktrust, but retaining the "Independent" in the name.

Entries (fiction or short stories) must be published in English translation in the UK in the year preceding the award and the author must be alive at the time that the translation is published. Uniquely, the prize acknowledges both the winning novelist and translator, each being awarded £5,000 and a magnum of champagne from drinks sponsor Champagne Taittinger.

Contents

Winners, shortlists and longlists

2010

Shortlist

Longlist

2009

Shortlist

Longlist

2008

Shortlist

Longlist

2007

Shortlist

2006

The 2006 prize was announced in May. The jury for the 2006 Prize was composed of: Boyd Tonkin (literary Editor, The Independent), the writers Paul Bailey, Margaret Busby and Maureen Freely, and Kate Griffin (Arts Council England).

Shortlist

Longlist

2005

2004

2003

2002

1996 to 2001

Prize in abeyance.

1995

1994

1993

1992

1991

1990





Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Independent Foreign Fiction Prize" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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