Imaginary painting  

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Ancient Rome (1757) by Giovanni Paolo Panini, a real painting filled with imaginary paintings of actual Roman antiquities.
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Ancient Rome (1757) by Giovanni Paolo Panini, a real painting filled with imaginary paintings of actual Roman antiquities.
The Experts (1837) by Alexandre-Gabriel Decamps. The monkeys are inspecting a fictional painting.
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The Experts (1837) by Alexandre-Gabriel Decamps. The monkeys are inspecting a fictional painting.
Reverse Side Of a Painting (1670) by Cornelis Norbertus Gysbrechts. Is the verso of a fictional painting?
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Reverse Side Of a Painting (1670) by Cornelis Norbertus Gysbrechts. Is the verso of a fictional painting?

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

A fictional painting or an imaginary painting is a painting which exists in a fictitious world. It may also refer to paintings or drawings that depict fictitious worlds. This page functions as a placeholder for various links.

Contents

Examples of paintings that only exist in a fictitious world

In literature

The work Eikones by Philostratus, a description of 64 paintings, is held by some of actually existing works of art, while others claim that they are imaginary paintings.

In Interpretazioni veneziane, Michelangelo Muraro and David Rosand state that:

Certainly the imagery that Aretino describes at the beginning of the Passion carries conviction. ... has stimulated commentators to suggest that Aretino is describing an imaginary painting by Titian or Tintoretto. ...

Nicholas Meyer's 1993 novel The Canary Trainer describes a fictional painting by the famous Impressionist Degas, which happens to show Sherlock Holmes.

In painting

In film

  • Brush with Fate (2003), a a made-for-TV film. which follows the life of an imaginary painting by Dutch painter Johannes Vermeer.

Paintings that depict imaginary, fictitious worlds and creatures

grotesque art, fantastic art

Michelangelo in Da Pintura Antiga (1548) remarks on painting imaginary beings:

"But if it so happens ... a work ... under pain of otherwise becoming shameful or false, requires fantasy ... [and that] certain limbs or elements of a figure are altered by borrowing from other species, for example transforming into a dolphin the hinder end of a griffon or a stag ... these alterations will be excellent and the substitution, however unreal it may seem, deserves to be declared a fine invention in the genre of the monstrous.
When a painter introduces into this kind of work of art chimerae and other imaginary beings in order to divert and entertain the senses and also to captivate the eyes of mortals who long to see unclassified and impossible things, he shows himself more respectful of reason than if he produced the usual figures of men or of animals." --tr. from Monsters of Our Own Making: The Peculiar Pleasures of Fear by Marina Warner.

The practice should be contrasted with realism (visual arts).

See also




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Imaginary painting" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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