I can no longer think what I want to think. My thoughts have been replaced by moving images  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

"I can no longer think what I want to think. My thoughts have been replaced by moving images" is an often-quoted phrase by French author Georges Duhamel, made famous by German philosopher Walter Benjamin in his essay The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction. Duhamel detested film. The English translation of this phrase is first featured in Illuminations (1968), an anthology of Benjamin writings translated by Harry Zohn.

French original

"Les images mouvantes se substituent à mes propres pensées» -- Scènes de la vie future (1930)

German translation

Ich kann schon nicht mehr denken, was ich denken will. Die beweglichen Bilder haben sich an den Platz meiner Gedanken gesetzt. --Walter Benjamin

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Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "I can no longer think what I want to think. My thoughts have been replaced by moving images" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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