History of Animals  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

History of Animals (or "Historia Animalium", or "On the History of Animals") is a zoological natural history text by Aristotle.

The work consists of lengthy descriptions (Greek: historiai) of countless species of fish, shellfish, and other animals and their anatomies. In the frame of the controversial search for absolute datings of Aristotle's works, some scholars have noticed that most of the marine species described in the book seem to match ones which are presently found in the Aegean Sea along the Turkish coastline.

Hence, it has been claimed that the book was sketched during Aristotle's stay in Lesbos, around 343 B.C., for further investigation.

Arabic translation

The Arabic translation of Historia Animalium comprises treatises 1-10 of the Kitāb al-Hayawān (The Book of Animals).

See also

Historiae animalium, a zoological natural history text by Conrad Gesner made 1551 CE to 1558 CE.




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "History of Animals" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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