Hilton Kramer  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

Hilton Kramer (1928, Gloucester, Massachusetts – March 27, 2012) was a U.S. art critic and cultural commentator.

Kramer was educated at Syracuse University, Columbia University, Harvard University, Indiana University and the New School for Social Research. He worked as the editor of Arts Magazine, art critic for The Nation, and from 1965 to 1982, as an art critic for The New York Times. He also published in the Art and Antiques Magazine and The New York Observer.

Over the course of his career, Kramer came to disagree with leftwing political views and what he perceived as the aesthetic nihilism characterizing a large majority of 20th century working artists and art critics. This change of position led to his resignation from The New York Times in 1982 to found The New Criterion, now a prominent conservative magazine for which Kramer was, with Roger Kimball, co-editor and publisher. Kramer took a strongly anti-Stalinist stance in his 2003 review of Anne Applebaum's Gulag: A History. In his 1999 The Twilight of the Intellectuals, he defended the anti-Stalinist views of art critic Clement Greenberg.

He died on March 27, 2012, in Harpswell, Maine.

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Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Hilton Kramer" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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