Hauts-de-Seine  

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Kunstformen der Natur (1904) by Ernst Haeckel
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Hauts-de-Seine (Template:IPA-fr; literally "Seine Heights") is a department of France located in the region of Île-de-France. It is part of the Grand Paris as it covers the western inner suburbs of Paris. With a population of 1,603,268 (as of 2016) and a total area of 176 square kilometres (68 square miles), it is the second-most highly densely populated department of France. Hauts-de-Seine is best known for containing the modern office, theatre and shopping complex La Défense. Its inhabitants are called Altoséquanais.

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Geography

Hauts-de-Seine and two other small départements, Seine-Saint-Denis and Val-de-Marne, form a ring around Paris, known as the Petite Couronne (literal translation: "little crown") and are together with the City of Paris included in the Greater Paris since 1 January 2016.

Petite Couronne

Administration

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Hauts-de-Seine is made up of three departmental arrondissements and 36 communes:

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Government

Hauts-de-Seine has a general council of which members are called general councillors. The general council is the deliberative organ of the department. The general councilors are elected by the inhabitants of the departement for a 6-years term. The general council is ruled by a president.

See Hauts-de-Seine General Council.

History

The Hauts-de-Seine department was created in 1968, from parts of the former départements of Seine and Seine-et-Oise. Its creation reflected the implementation of a law passed in 1964, and Nanterre had already been selected as the prefecture for the new department early in 1965.

In the 1990s and early 2000s, Hauts-de-Seine received national attention as the result of a corruption scandal concerning the misuse of public funds provided for the department's housing projects. Implicated were former minister and former president of the Hauts-de-Seine General Council, Charles Pasqua, and other personalities of the RPR party. (See corruption scandals in the Paris region.)




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Hauts-de-Seine" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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