Harriet Beecher Stowe  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

Harriet Elizabeth Beecher Stowe (June 14, 1811July 1, 1896) was a white American abolitionist and novelist, whose Uncle Tom's Cabin (1852) attacked the cruelty of slavery; it reached millions as a novel and play, and became influential, even in Britain. It made the political issues of the 1850s regarding slavery tangible to millions, energizing anti-slavery forces in the North. It angered and embittered the South. The impact was summed up by Abraham Lincoln when he met Stowe, "So you're the little woman who wrote the book that started this great war!"<



Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Harriet Beecher Stowe" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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